The Unofficial ‘Running Science’ 5k Plan for Old(ish) Folks

Here it is. At last:

My own 5k plan, designed from the workouts and ideas in Dr. Owen Anderson’s excellent book, Running Science.

Before the unveiling, let me explain the key design principles of the plan.

  • Five runs per week. I know many people have 6 day/week plans, but I need to get some writing done (and still do my job, be a father, be a husband, etc), so five days is the most I can handle (and I’m not even sure how that’ll go–I started with 3x/week). I haven’t put much effort into putting these runs in order, but obviously you don’t want to do hard runs back to back.
  • Strength training/plyometrics. The plan leads with strength training, and then reduces this to a maintenance level. This is the “Old(ish) Folks” part of the plan, as this should help prevent injuries and address some of the muscles loss associated with aging.
  • Volume. Anderson says runners get rapidly diminishing returns after 40 miles/week, so this plan builds from about 20 miles/week up to nearly 40. The elites may need to get the small benefit of additional miles, but if you’re an elite you’re likely not going to read this anyway.
  • Intensity. It aims for 25% of total miles being high intensity (close to or faster than 5k pace). To this end, after each day’s workout I list the hard miles and the total miles in parentheses. Anderson does say one can increase the percentage, but I opted against this.
  • Incrementalism. I tried to increase either volume or intensity, but not both in any one week. I do break the old 10% rule (week 5), though I tried to cut intensity as I did the big volume jump.
  • Periodization. Every 4th week is about a 25% reduction in effort. Time to heal and let your body gain strength and power.
  • Racing. It’s easy to add 5k races (or even 10ks, I suppose) into the plan. Just substitute for a run of comparable volume/intensity (a 5k would be about 3 hard miles, and 5 miles total, counting warmup). I don’t think a half marathon would be a good idea (unless you do it really easy).
  • For more info on each of the workouts, see this post. You’ll notice I opted to do the 30/20/10 instead of the 30/30. Just my preference.

And a final caveat: Even though I created it, this thing freaks me out! It looks hard, and I’m not sure if I can do it. But, as with all plans, the trick is not to look at the worst workout–look at the first workout.

And now, the plan…

 

Unofficial Running Science 5k plan for Old(ish) Folks

  • Week 1
    1. Circuit run (2 laps) +jump rope + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (1.5 hard miles, 5.5 total miles)
    2. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)
    3. Circuit run +jump rope + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (1.5, 5.5)
    4. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)
    5. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)

TOTALS: 3 hard, 25 total

  • Week 2
    1. Circuit run +jump rope + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (1.5, 5.5)
    2. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)
    3. Circuit run +jump rope + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (1.5, 5.5)
    4. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)
    5. 30/20/10 + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2, 6)

TOTALS:  5 hard, 25 total

  • Week 3
    1. Circuit run (+jump rope) + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (1.5, 5.5)
    2. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)
    3. Circuit run (+jump rope) + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (1.5, 5.5)
    4. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)
    5. 5k Race +2 miles warm up. (3, 5)
      1. (NOTE: I just put this here because I already have a race scheduled. You might substitute a 30/20/10 or some 400s)

TOTALS: 6 hard, 24 total

  • Week 4 (light week)
    1. Circuit run + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (1.5, 5.5)
    2. Easy run – 3 miles. (0, 3)
    3. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    4. Easy run – 3 miles. (0, 3)
    5. Easy run – 3 miles. (0, 3)

TOTALS:  4.25 hard, 21.25 total

  • Week 5 (increase volume)
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)
    3. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    4. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    5. Easy run – 8 miles. (0, 8)

TOTALS: 5.5 hard, 31.5 total

  • Week 6 (increase intensity)
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    3. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    4. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    5. Superset [(600m@max, 1000 @6:30 pace, 4 min jog) x3] +1.5 warm up, 1.5 warm down. (3; 7)

TOTALS: 8.5 hard, 32.5 total

  • Week 7
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    3. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm dow n. (2.75, 6.75)
    4. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    5. Superset x 3 + 1.5 warm up, 1.5 warm down. (3; 7)

TOTALS: 8.5 hard, 32.5 total

  • Week 8 (light week)
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 3 miles. (0, 3)
    3. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    4. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)
    5. Easy run – 4 miles. (0, 4)

TOTALS: 5.5 hard, 24.5 total

  • Week 9
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    3. 12x400m, 60 sec rest + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (3, 7)
    4. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    5. Superset x 3 + 1.5 warm up, 1.5 warm down. (3; 7)

TOTALS: 8.75 hard, 32.75 total

  • Week 10
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    3. 12x400m, 60 sec rest + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (3, 7)
    4. Easy run – 8 miles. (0, 8)
    5. Superset x 3 + 1.5 warm up, 1.5 warm down. (3; 7)

TOTALS: 8.75 hard, 34.75 total

  • Week 11
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    3. 12x400m, 60 sec rest + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (3, 7)
    4. Easy run – 10 miles. (0, 10)
    5. Superset x 3 + 1.5 warm up, 1.5 warm down. (3; 7)

TOTALS: 8.75 hard, 36.75 total

  • Week 12 (light week)
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 3miles. (0, 3)
    3. 8x400m, 60 sec rest + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2, 6)
    4. Easy run – 5 miles. (0, 5)
    5. Easy run – 7 miles. (0, 7)

TOTALS: 4.75 hard, 27.75 total

  • Week 13
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    3. 12x400m, 60 sec rest + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (3, 7)
    4. Easy run – 12 miles. (0, 12)
    5. Superset x 3 + 1.5 warm up, 1.5 warm down. (3; 7)

TOTALS: 8.75 hard, 38.75 total

  • Week 14
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 7 miles. (0, 7)
    3. 12x400m, 60 sec rest + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (3, 7)
    4. Easy run – 12 miles. (0, 12)
    5. Superset x 3 + 1.5 warm up, 1.5 warm down. (3; 7)

TOTALS: 8.75 hard, 39.75 total

  • Week 15 (Begin Taper)
    1. 30/20/10 + one circuit + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (2.75, 6.75)
    2. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)
    3. 12x400m, 60 sec rest + 2.5 miles warm up/ 1.5 miles warm down. (3, 7)
    4. Easy run – 10 miles. (0, 10)
    5. Easy run – 6 miles. (0, 6)

TOTALS: 5.75 hard, 35.75 total

  • Week 16 (Race Week – Taper)
    1. Superset x 3 + 1.5 warm up, 1.5 warm down. (3; 7)
    2. Easy run – 7 miles. (0, 7)
    3. Easy run – 5 miles. (0, 5)
    4. Easy run – 3 miles. (0, 3)
    5. 5k Race (3, 5)

TOTALS: 6 hard, 27 total (counting race)

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End of the Off-Season

First came the leg injury, and then a bit of a cold that was a real linger-er (I only felt really terrible for a couple days, but the cough and congestion lasted over two weeks, and still isn’t totally gone). This all annoyed me, of course, but I chose to treat the down time like an off-season. Rest. Heal. And get excited about workouts again.

But now the off-season is over.

I’ll have more on goals later, as well as more on my Running Science inspired 5k plan, but I already know that I have two 5k goals:

  1. Finally break 20 minutes (as per my own odd standards)
  2. Hit 19:30

(Yes, I know the second goal would cover the first. But 20 minutes is such a nice round number that I have to get excited when I hit it, yet at the same time I’m only a few seconds away from that now, so it isn’t really enough of a goal for the “season.”)

And one other goal that beats them all:

0. Stay healthy.

 

Short Courses & Fast Times

I’m closing in on the second full year of my return to running (after a mere thirty year layoff), and while I’m pleased to be running 5k  after 5k at just about exactly my goal time of nineteen-anything, I’ve yet to really break that magic number of twenty minutes. And I blame the courses. Or my Garmin. Or at least the combination of the courses and the Garmin.

In the good old days of cotton shirts and cheap shoes, races were timed with an official stopwatch that started with the gun. No chip timers. No same-day online results. (No “online” anything.) And no GPS watches telling you the race was only 3.08 miles.

It’s this last one that’s made me think: what counts as “really” breaking twenty minutes? The chip time on my most recent race was 19:58. But not so fast. Here come my Garmin (which I remembered to stop at the line this time) telling me I’m 2/100s of a mile short of the needed 3.1. Not as bad as the 19:20 I ran last year… on a 2.9 mile course. Still, a quick calculation of my average pace tells me that would put me across the line in 20:10 of a full 3.1, so goal not yet met.

And it gets worse. I don’t normally bother with the Garmin for intervals on the track (though I’m not doing those lately… see my 30/20/10 post), but the last time I did the watch kept telling me I’d hit the ¼ mile split ten or twenty feet shy of the real split. I know 400m is not exactly ¼ mile, but this was more than the 2 meter difference. So the Garmin may actually be a bit short on its own.

But even when the course is long, I’m still in trouble. A good kick in the last ¼ mile (according to my Garmin) might put me under my goal, but it sure would look foolish to do this ½ mile out of the official finish and then putz my way across the line, passed back by all the runners I just passed. I have some dignity. A little.

I suppose I could start wearing two or three watches, or pacing out courses with a measuring wheel, but lacking that level of dedication (obsession) I’m going to just go with the watch distance and wait for the good day to line up with that one good course that’s at least 3.1, but not much more than 3.1.